Why Hello There

It seems that you have stumbled upon this site, for which I have no answer as to why you are here. All I have for you are more questions. Questions upon questions upon questions. So, if you don’t want to think, or you expect some kind of answer, then run little one. Run very quickly away. For this is not the place for you, and you have stumbled into an ever expanding mind with no foreseeable exit.

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Giving Birth to a God

Its interesting the adjectives we use to describe our actions or our life choices. When I first moved to Berlin, people would often say I was “brave” and “courageous” for following my dream and deciding to do what I chose to do, but what they don’t realize is the amount of fear involved because I wasn’t just following a dream. I was chasing a lifetime. A lifetime of linguistic specialist, speech pathologist, front-loaded learning, a parents divorce, that I was running not toward anything, but I was finally flexing my wings.

So you see, I don’t run, I fly, and the problem with dreams is that when they are uttered, we give power and raise gods, that’s a really intimidating thing to think about, to think about that possibly, “I could give birth to a god,” and here’s the other thing you have to understand, but, for women, we can do it twice over. With our physical bodies and with our minds. We do it thrice over with our emotions and our communities with our interpersonal understanding of each other’s commiseration.

So you see, people say that I am brave for going and doing this, but what they don’t realize is that I was giving birth to a god that expands beyond our adjectives.

Translation Tuesday: “Heimat Who Lives in a Box” by A.E. Sadeghipour (Asymptote Blog)

For this week’s Translation Tuesday, inexplicable shapeshifting, bad table service, tangible numerals, and a loving friendship that defies spatial logic are on the menu in “Heimat who Lives in a Box,” written and translated from the German by A.E. Sadeghipour. In this surreal microfiction, a dinner date is marred by embarrassment and a rude (and seemingly inhuman) waitstaff. Sadeghipour’s ability to flout realism while preserving the conventions of the short narrative leads us to a conclusion that is both ironic and “happily ever after”-esque.

Read the short story here!

Is This What Bravery Feels Like?

Is this what bravery feels like?

Crying in the middle stall of the Schönefeld  airport

Missing you dearly and not regretting a moment, decision, or choice.

Is this what bravery feels like?

Life in two suitcases

One abused violin

and objects left behind never to be reclaimed.

Is this what bravery feels like?

Denying the handouts

Living in an abandoned warehouse

Sleeping on pallets

because your parents said,

“You chose to be that way.”

Is this what bravery feels like?

Ending a marriage of 20 years

To live in a one room apartment

Racking up debt from never having worked a day in your life

Children visiting every other weekend

Loving you, hating you, never understanding you.

Is this what bravery feels like?

Shaving your head to hide in a basement bar

With foreign tongues lapping your ear for language

As you drink piss tasting piña coladas.

Is this what bravery feels like?

Period sex and discarded tampons

Clots clambering down your leg

Wondering where all the bleeding was truly coming from.

Is this what bravery feels like?

Loving this

Hating this

Living this

Licking this

Just a little taste

And wondering

Is this what bravery feels like?

T.A.N.T.I. Tables. Season 2, Episode 5: Code Switching x Synergizing (podcast)

For those of you who missed my interview and performance on Wednesday, here is the Tanti Table: Code Switching x Synergizing podcast. If you are bummed that you missed the interview/performance, check this out!


Writer, educator, and newly published poet, Allia Sadeghipour joins us this week at the Tanti Table, where we bring together the Thinkers Anecdotes News Taboos & Intersectionality of Berlin & beyond, sip some tea and question the powers that be!

Allia shares how her childhood in Iran and the U.S. shaped her writing style, her commitment to code-switching, and the importance of being seen in our communities. Her new book of poetry, The Ghosts of Berlin traces the haunting and alluring forms of our brutal yet beautiful Berlin. She’s been featured in the magazine What’s Afghan Punk Rock Anyway?, created by our co-host Armeghan Taheri, so we talk to them about Issue 2- the “love” issue, about the different forms of love, and about duh- about punk rock!

Bear Radio: https://www.bearradio.org/tantitable

Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/5LXeejZvfnB3IZYJWQHgyU

Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/tanti-table/id1454501328?mt=2

Concerned Citizen of the Universe. Episode 6: Love-Heart of the Matter (podcast)

Hey Everybody! As a Concerned Citizen of the Universe, I participated in the Love-Heart of the Matter episode. If you got some time and an open mind, check it out! This is my second ever podcast session, so I truly hope you enjoy the listen.


The word love, for most people, probably conjures an image of two individuals embracing, a family gathered for dinner, or intense passion. Our first clear images of love come from parents or Disney movies, where love is depicted as rosy cheeks or a basketball-sized heart boomeranging through an elastic chest. Other images might come from advertising. As a largely consumerist culture, western society is inundated with products and services promising love, or what feels like love. But the complexity suggested by countless discussions, research, and divorce cases implies a labyrinth fit for the most inquisitive souls. Here, in part 1 of our latest episode, we begin to explore this long-pondered topic.

SOUNDCLOUD: https://soundcloud.com/areyouconcerned/love-part-1


Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/concerned-citizens-of-the-universe/id1483520897?

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